Decorating Design Ideas Simple Projects

How to Make a Pinto Bean Wreath

Pinto Bean Wreath

Bean wreath copy

[Disclaimer: April has been very busy being a mother to 5 intelligent, rambunctious, and vocal children and one cute, but demanding baby. But April, being April, could not help but do all sorts of amazing projects as well as being super-mom. However, she has not had as much time to blog about all the projects. So I begged her to let me put some of them up on the blog and brag about how amazing she is. She approved the blogging part, but not the bragging part. Luckily, this is my blog post and I get to do what I want!]

Apparently April and Paula saw a project on Pinterest in which a super creative person made a wreath out of lima beans and white paint. So Paula and April decided to try their hand at the project.

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Materials and Tools for Pinto Bean Wreath:

  • Lots of pinto beans
  • Straw wreath
  • Glue gun and plenty of glue sticks
  • Spray paint
  • Ribbon to hang the wreath
  • Additional decorations (optional)
  • Drop cloth or newspaper to spray paint the wreath on and keep everything clean.

However, rather than using lima beans (because they have no redeeming value and who wants those left over after the project is completed) they used pinto beans.

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The found straw wreaths at the local craft store and used a coupon to get them 40% off. (Chaching, chaching!)

After debating about it for a few minutes they decided to leave the plastic packaging on the wreath to ensure the wreath stayed together after gluing beans all over it. The plastic did melt a little during the gluing process, but it remained in tack and was the right choice.

April chose to glue her beans as fast as possible, burning her fingers a little in the process, but getting done much faster than Paula who decided to painstakingly glue her beans on in tidy, even rows. But because beans are different sizes, both wreaths looked very similar despite Paula’s careful precision verse April’s random git-er-done version. We suggest just gluing the beans on in a random pattern. The pinto bean wreath naturally started looking like snakeskin, but this was remedied with paint because none of us wanted a faux snake skin wreath this time.

April wanted her wreath to be appropriate for all seasons, so she chose a burnt yellow-orange spray paint and two different ribbons she could swap out depending on the season. She also added a large wooden letter D, for her family’s last name, and opted to keep it quite natural with just a slight whitewash on the wood.

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To hang the wreath, April simply looped the ribbon through the hole in the “D” and through the center of the wreath and then using a large, flat headed nail meant for hammering down shingles, tacked the two ribbon ends into the top edge of the door.

I liked the result. My one hesitation in making my own is the idea of individually gluing all those little beans onto a straw wreath. Thus, for another version see my alternative wreath here.

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